Tennis Elbow: Getting to Grips with the issue

Tennis Elbow: Getting to Grips with the issue

Tennis elbow is a very common term used to describe lateral elbow pain. However, people can experience the condition without having ever picked up a racquet. The most up to date term currently is lateral epicondylalgia (LE) with “algia” meaning pain. This reflects the general shift away from it being considered an inflammatory condition in which the tendons around the elbow are inflamed. Rather, it is thought that the tendons become overloaded and sensitisation of the area occurs causing a heightened pain response that in turn causes inhibition of the muscles in the forearm.

Cricket Injuries

Cricket Injuries

With the start of the 2017/2018 Ashes tour and the cricket season well underway, this week’s blog will be discussing cricket related injuries.  

 

Although cricket is a non-contact sport, injuries do occur and given the complexity of the sport they often can be difficult to manage. It is not a surprise that fast bowlers have the highest injury prevalence of 20%.  This is followed by spin bowlers, batsmen then wicketkeepers.

AC Joint pain - The "Other" Shoulder Pain

AC Joint pain - The "Other" Shoulder Pain

The Acromioclavicular (AC) joint is located at the lateral tip of the shoulder. The joint is formed by two bones, the clavicle (collarbone) and the acromion (a portion of the scapula/shoulder blade). In between the joint sits a fibrocartilage meniscal disc and the bones are connected by a number of ligaments, muscles and a joint capsule

Plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis Is a very common cause of heel pain. It can be quite debilitating and can last for months if not addressed. Typically, pain will be felt on the inside of the heel and arch. Pain can be sharp or achy. There can be a small amount of swelling over the medial heel as well as tenderness to touch. Mornings are worse, with it usually taking anywhere from 2-3 minutes to an hour for the stiffness and pain to reduce.

Groin Pain

Groin Pain

As pre-season training gets underway for winter sports codes we generally see an increase in the number of patients with groin pain presenting to our clinic. Discussing groin pain as a whole is a very large topic, so for the purposes of this blog I will discuss non-traumatic groin pain and in particular the most common factors that can lead to injury.

Non-traumatic groin injuries are typically complex and require a thorough assessment to determine the factors that have led to the injury and a comprehensive exercise rehabilitation program to recondition the athlete to be ready to return to their sport.

Low Back Pain

Low Back Pain

Approximately 80% of people will experience lower back pain at some stage in their life. It is one of the most common reasons for people missing work and seeing a doctor or physiotherapist. Although it is extremely common it can often a bit of an unknown to the general public as to what is the cause for their pain and disability.

Wrist and Hand Injuries

We use our hands repeatedly every day so it’s not surprising that sometimes we develop pain and discomfort in our fingers, wrists and forearms. Injuries in the wrist and hand can be caused due to traumatic events (e.g. a fall on an outstretched hand) or overuse, repetitive activities (e.g. computer use, racquet sports).

Anatomy

The wrist and hand complex is made up of 27 bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, nerves and blood vessels. Damage to any of these structures can cause pain and can affect your ability to use your hands effectively.

Common wrist and hand injuries include:

·         Fractures

·         Tendon pathologies e.g. Mallet finger, De Quervain’s Disease

·         Ligament injuries e.g. sprains

·         Joint inflammation

·         Nerve entrapments e.g. Carpal tunnel syndrome

·         Arthritic conditions

·         Ganglion cysts

If hand and wrist injuries are not assessed and treated properly this may lead to further impairments in the future.

Early management

Should include rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE principle) for the first 48-72 hours. Anti-inflammatories (NSAIDS) also have a role in early management, taken in the form of tablets and topical gels.

Physiotherapy

Your physiotherapist will go through a comprehensive assessment to determine the source of your pain. Once the source of your pain has been established the initial aim of treatment includes education and addressing acute symptoms (pain, lack of movement and loss of strength).

When indicated your physiotherapist will start to address other issues such as loading, muscle imbalances, poor posture and biomechanics.  

Prevention

To reduce the risk of recurring wrist and hand injuries it is important to maintain adequate strength and length of the muscles around the wrist joint.

Your physiotherapist will advise you in activities that should be avoided to decrease irritation.

Return to sport

When returning to sport it is essential that you discuss this with your physiotherapist. Your abilities will be assessed through a series of tests to determine whether you are ready to return to pre-injury activities and/or sport. 

The Importance of Musculoskeletal Screening

The Importance of Musculoskeletal Screening

Finals time for most winter sports is fast approaching and from a physiotherapy perspective this is the time of year that we see a spike in sporting injuries. A lot of these injuries tend to be to parts of the body that have some sort of deficit, be it strength, length or control. It is quite hard to be able to identify these areas yourself and even physiotherapists would find it hard to accurate identify these deficits purely through observation.

Sports Injury Management Seminar

a FREE seminar on sports injury management presented by the Physiotherapists at East Vic Park Physiotherapy. Topics will include muscle contusion (corkie) management, post-game recovery and a practical session on strapping. 

Whether your sports season is heading into finals or you are about to start gearing up for the summer season ahead, the information presented will help you to perform at your best.

Appropriate for all athletes, parents, trainers and coaches.

Food will be provided - let us know if you have any dietary requests.

Spaces are limited so call us on 9361 3777 to secure your place now.

Rotator Cuff Injuries

Rotator Cuff Injuries

The movements associated with sports such as a swimming stroke, cricket bowl, golf swing or tennis serve, when completed in numerous repetitions, particularly if there is a dysfunctional movement pattern present, can develop into a shoulder injury such as impingement syndrome. Impingement syndrome also known as Bursitis, Subacromial Impingement, or Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy can lead to long stints on the sideline if not treated correctly.

Healthy Eating 101

Healthy Eating 101

A lot of people choose to change their diet as a New Years resolution, but which one do you choose to follow? There are many popular types of diets out there which can make your resolution complicated and confusing. We enjoy listening to Dr Mike Evans - who in this video talks about what's the best diet you can start that will help lose weight. 

Adolescent injuries Part 2

Adolescent injuries Part 2

Fractures that occur in the younger athlete usually consist of one of three types; 

  1. Fracture to the shaft of the bone 
  2. Fracture involving the growth plate – referred to as a Salter-Harris Fracture
  3. Avulsion fracture - where the attachment of ligaments or tendons onto the bone is pulled away from the main body of the bone. 

 

Recovery Part 2/2

Recovery Part 2/2

Nutrition

 

Eating well and at the right time can have a significant effect on your ability to recover from a bout of exercise. As a rough guide it is recommended you eat 1 gram of carbohydrates per 1kg bodyweight within an hour after exercising to replace glycogen stores in muscles and liver. Consuming 10-25g of protein in addition to the carbs will aid recovery of muscles.